Valve facing tool

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Dennis_Brown
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Valve facing tool

Post by Dennis_Brown » Wed Sep 18, 2019 11:10 pm

The valve facing tool pictured in the " What is it " in the vintage ford leaves me with a question
How was the valve turned to face it? I have one of the type pictured and also one that is a little different.
Did they use a hand drill or brace attached to the valve stem or what? How accurate were they, has anyone tried one out to see how well they work?


Scott_Conger
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by Scott_Conger » Wed Sep 18, 2019 11:18 pm

When the valves were two-piece valves with cast iron heads, the tool was "ok". When fit back into rattling valve guides and pretty much seating in whatever seat the mechanic left in the block, your car would be improved over how it was operating prior to surgery. A look at period handbooks and service guides, you'll see a remarkable amount of valve work being done to these cars...constantly.

Very different than with today's materials (valves) and where installed, seats.

That tool won't make any significant progress on a modern valve other than to ruin it.

They're great for display, though.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!


V4F
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by V4F » Thu Sep 19, 2019 11:19 am

A handle is held onto the stem with a set screw.
Attachments
Valve Refacing Tool.jpg


2nighthawks
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by 2nighthawks » Thu Sep 19, 2019 11:57 am

Scott C. - I have a very antique similar tool/fixture to the one pictured, except that mine appears to be of better manufacture & quality. Mine was originally sold by Warshawsky in Chicago, who I believe eventually became J.C. Whitney. The cutter was a carbide insert in a fixture that was adjustable so as to cut valve faces from 30 deg. to 60 deg. as well as the more common valve face angle of 45 degrees such as Model T & Model A Ford valves. With a bit of practice, mostly to develop a "feel" for the tension applied to the adjustments for securing the valve stem with just the right amount of tension to allow valve rotation with crank handle but while totally eliminating any "play", and careful gradual adjustment to feed the valve into the carbide cutter, the tool will do an excellent job of refacing a valve. In fact, I would compare the quality of the work done with my tool, even on modern valves, with any other machined valve face machined with modern equipment. The only drawback is that the process, when done correctly, is very, very slow! (But us "hobbyists" have plenty of time, right?) And before anybody suggests possible damage to valve stem by the guide (soft cast iron) that secures the valve in the fixture, or by the set screw that secures the crank handle to the valve stem, I would add that careful adjusting of the tension of the adjustment of the soft cast iron valve stem guide, and a small piece of shim stock, or even a tiny piece of aluminum from a soda pop can like I use between crank handle set-screw and valve stem, and with liberal use of lubricating oil as per instructions with the tool, absolutely no damage will occur to the valve stem. I have used this tool extensively for many years, ever since I bought it as a teen-aged kid with a Model A Ford in Chicago in the '50's! Incidentally, the tool like mine was commonly sold ("back in the day") by several companies besides Warshawskys, back when Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Wards, Western Auto, etc, etc, sold many parts & tool for Fords,....FWIW,....harold


2nighthawks
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by 2nighthawks » Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:18 pm

Okay,...I just have to post just a bit more here, and then I'll "shut-up"! Promise!

For what it's worth, with use of Neway valve seat cutting equipment (discussed in depth on this forum in the past), and an antique, hand-operated valve refacing tool like mine that I just described above, an excellent and complete valve job is indeed, very possible by any of us do-it-yourself, shade tree Model T mechanics! I might also add that while Neway valve seat cutting equipment is expensive (but worth it!) these antique, hand-operated valve refacing tools like mine that I described above are quite commonly found at swap meets for as cheap as five bucks! I bought an extra one at a swap meet a couple years ago at a swap meet, not only to have an extra one, but mostly because I tightened the set-screw on my original one that I bought as a kid (in the '50's) too tight, and broke it! Quite often, you'll see one of these for sale at a swap meet very cheap, because the owner really doesn't what it is! Again,....FWIW,....harold


2nighthawks
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by 2nighthawks » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:30 am

Oops,...typo,....last line in my above post should read,....doesn't KNOW what it is!


2nighthawks
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Re: Valve facing tool

Post by 2nighthawks » Wed Sep 25, 2019 4:35 pm

Marshall V. Daut - I brought this back up to the top again, because you asked a question in regard to refacing valves, and if it is necessary to take "T" valves to a machine shop to be refaced,....????

I entered this discussion as I believe comments (altho' much to long-winded as is typical of me) I believe what I wrote at least in part, might serve to answer your question as to one way a "do-it-yerself" Model T mechanic can do a very nice job of refacing valves with a hand-operated antique tool/fixture that can often be found at swap meets for as cheap as five bucks. Also, if you can a bit more expense Marshall, Neway also manufactures & sells their own modern version of a little hand-operated machine for refacing valves. I'd buy one myself, except that my little antique valve reface works so well that I can't quite justify the expense! ( :^) .....FWIW,.....harold

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