How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

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Mastfayai
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How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by Mastfayai » Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:24 am

the Ford Model T how was paint applied to the metal? Brushes, spray guns or dipping or what?


John kuehn
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by John kuehn » Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:40 am

Go to the MTFCA home page and click on the encyclopedia. Go to painting and there you will find out lots of information about painting, paint application and the processes involved.
This is a great source for Model T information and most questions can be answered there.

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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by CudaMan » Tue Nov 19, 2019 9:14 am

There is a good description in the book "Ford Methods and the Ford Shops":

https://books.google.com/books?id=TcAqZ ... &q&f=false
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by Steve Jelf » Tue Nov 19, 2019 9:58 am

Ford Methods & the Ford Shops is one of the several extras included in Bruce McCalley's Model T Encyclopedia on disk.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by Rich Bingham » Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:44 am

Great sources fellows. The short answer is bodies were delivered painted with brushes before the moving assembly line (1913-14). When Ford began building their own bodies paint was flowed on in a recirculating system with a sort of “garden hose” apparatus. When color was once again made available in 1926-27, “pyroxylin” lacquer was sprayed on.
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by bud delong » Tue Nov 19, 2019 12:07 pm

My question is what year did Ford start building their own bodies?????????????????????????????? :D Bud. :D


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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by Rich Bingham » Tue Nov 19, 2019 12:49 pm

From what I gather, the moving assembly line was a benchmark wherein the transition began to bodies made in-house. I believe open car bodies were increasingly made by Ford through 1915-16 until most if not all were made in house by 1920. The enclosed styles continued to be supplied by outside sources even into the Model A era. When Fisher Body was acquired by GM (1919 ?) it put stress on Ford to build their own bodies to ensure reliable supply as production spiraled ever upwards.

Corrections by them as know are most welcome! :D :D
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by DanTreace » Tue Nov 19, 2019 5:35 pm

Rich

During the later twenties, Ford was stamping out body panels and shipping to branch assembly plants, the mostly all steel '26-'27 were made by Ford, assembled, upholstered, and painted at various branch assembly plants, exception possibly the Fordor, likely obtained outside, lots of wood in that one!



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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by TRDxB2 » Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:48 am

One method was flow painting the body -
http://www.mtfca.com/cgi-bin/discus/sho ... ost=195547
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by Dan Hatch » Wed Nov 20, 2019 7:09 am

This type of painting is called flow coating. Last place I saw it used was at Bush Hog. They then went to powder coating. Dan

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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by RustyFords » Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:32 am

My 24 Touring shows what I believe is evidence of the flowed-on paint method. These stripes in the very old paint are what I’m referring to. They continue around the entire body in a way that allows you to see exactly what the pattern was that the painter was following.

Also present at the bottom of the body panels are drips.

And, although the fenders and aprons have the same old paint, they do not show the striations, which tends to verify my theory (because those parts were not flow painted).

The car was thoroughly used up during its working life and is not a true preservation/originality type car due to the farm mods it received. However, due to it being stored indoors in West Texas , the body is nearly perfect and I believe the paint is original.
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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by bud delong » Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:51 am

The org question was [how were model T bodies painted?] I think a better question to have asked would relate to what year,body mfg,body type,and where built.We are not all the same and neither were Model T"s :D Bud. :D


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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by sweet23 » Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:29 am

The book "Model T Service Bulletin Essentials" Has two articles bout how paint is repaired in the field. While not the way the factory would have painted, it gives a view into the past. The materials used, Types of paint, and its application are all outlined in these articles. The early paints make no mention of spray equipment, while the lacquers do.

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Re: How were Ford Model T bodies painted?

Post by DanTreace » Wed Nov 20, 2019 6:02 pm

Very different types of paint applications from the different factories of the day. Gravity flow painting was well suited to assembly line, Ford used that for bodies, and used vats of enamels for sheetmetal, along with drying ovens too. Later the steel bodies got spray painted by late 1925.

Other firms used spray painting very early, for enamels too, note this article in 1916.

Packard was spray painting colors on bodies.
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